The "Original" Great Controversy Project
      "The Storm Is Coming!"

Testimonials

"How exciting it is to see this all important book circulated to every creature
on earth during these last days. I can think of no more important personal
ministries project for our people to become engaged in as personal evengelists."

      Jeffrey K. Wilson
      Director
      Planned Giving & Trust Services
      General Conference of Seventh-day Adventists


"The Great Controversy Project is extremely timely for both Seventh-day Adventists and those not of our faith. For Seventh-day Adventists because among many the Mission of Adventism is hazy at best. The Three Angels Messages of Revelation 14:6-20 outline our mission. The Great Controversy is very valuable for those not of our faith because the prophecies outlined in the Bible and in this book are being fulfilled. We have personally given financially for this project and we urge all others to do the same.
      Joel O. Tomkins, Retired
      President Mid-America Union



"Dear Amazing Facts, I read your book The Great Controversy and it has changed my life. It is so valuable that I find myself reluctant to let it go. I have three family members that would like to get a copy of the book. Could you please tell me how I could obtain three copies for my family? Thank you so much and may God bless you for the lives you have changed."
      DH From AZ


I recently finished reading your book The Great Controversy. I found this book to be a very informative and interesting read. I would very much like to have a list of names of books and literature written by this author.
      BN from MT


I am only up to Martin Luther and thus far this is a very well written book that reveals facts that piece many things together. The research seems to be online with other sites that I have read that are not subjective.
      JB from PA


Thank you for the book. I would like to inquire about ordering more to give to family and friends.
      EE from MI


This book was a good read and was Scriptural.
      J from CA


My mother called me recently with questions and concerns about this book that her, and several of her neighbors unexpectedly received. From what I've see here on your website, this looks quite legitimate and seems to comply with our faith and beliefs in God's Word. I'm an avid inquirer into the study of eschatology and events currently unfolding that coincide perfectly with Biblical Prophecy.
      TL from CO


Praise God for your project! I read The Great Controversy a few years ago. Truly life-changing! I really believe I should read it again. May God continue to bless you and this project.
      PF


This book seems to me to be a long awaited answer to my questions and an answer to my prayers. I was raised a Catholic then became a< Protestant believer. I never felt right not keeping the fourth commandment or celebrating the pagan church holidays. This book has answered so many questions and helped me to understand my Catholic upbringing. None of my Christian friends understand why I have been trying to keep the Sabbath and don't go to their church anymore. This book has confirmed what my heart has been telling me all along, and that is to listen to Jesus and love for Him and obedience to Him matters more than anything.
      LM


Thank you for the labor of love you poured out in
sending the book to me and my neighbors.

      EK from ND


We have also received un-named emails such as the following:
"I was recently i the beauty shop and everyone was talking about a book called The Great Controversy that they had received in the mail. I hadn't received one and so one of the ladies gave me the web address that was in the book and would like to have a copy of this book if you have any left.

John Huss

John Huss
John Huss
(1369-1415)

Jan Hus, a theologian, was the head of Charles University in Prague. His teachings were closely aligned wuth those of John Wycliffe (1328-1384) , such as emphasising personal piety and purity of life and stressing the role of the Scriptures as the authority for the church. An early publication by him, On the Church, defined the church as the body of Christ with Christ its only head, and taught that only God can forgive sin. These beliefs put him into conflict with the Catholic Church who regarded him and Wyckcliffe as two of the most dangerous heretics in Europe. On July 6, 1415, condemned as an arch-heretic by the Council of Constance and turned over to the state for execution, Jan Hus sang a hymn as the flames engulfed his body in a meadow just outside the city walls of Constance. Hus was charged with propagating the heretical teachings of the late 14th-century English reformer John Wycliffe, "the Morning Star of the Reformation," whose bones the Council of Constance ordered disinterred and burned.

Huldreich Zwigli

Huldreich Zwigli
Huldreich Zwigli
(1484-1531)
Huldreich Zwingli Huldreich (or Ulrich) Zwingli (1484–1531) was the leader of the Swiss Reformation, and founder of the Swiss Reformed Churches. Independent from Martin Luther, Zwingli arrived at similar conclusions in his own personal study of the Scriptures. Zwingli is perhaps best known today for his teaching that the Lord’s Supper is purely symbolic, as opposed to the Transubstantiation view of Roman Catholicism or the Consubstantiation view adopted by Luther — there was great animosity between Martin Luther and he on this issue.
Zwingli was born in Wildhaus, St. Gall, Switzerland to a prominent family of the middle classes. He was the third of eight sons. His father Ulrich was the chief magistrate in town, and his uncle Bartolomeus the vicar.
Zwingli’s beliefs were simple and straightforward: the Bible is truth; anything not in the Bible is not truth. It was the simplicity of this message that garnered him great public support from his people in Switzerland; and eventually outrage, and even war, from Roman officials.
Zwingli’s Reformation was supported by the magistrate and population of Zürich, and led to significant changes in civil life, and state matters in Zürich. In particular, this movement was known for mercilessly persecuting Anabaptists and other followers of Christ who maintained a nonresistant stance. The reformation was spread from Zürich to five other cantons of Switzerland, while the remaining five sternly held on to the Roman Catholic faith.
Zwingli was killed in 1531 at Kappel am Albis, while serving as a military chaplain in a battle against the Catholic cantons.